Topics in Applied Microeconomics

  • Total class time: 40 hours.
  • Unit: Centro Universitário FECAP Liberdade (Av. da Liberdade, 532).
  • Times: Tuesday and Thursday from 18:00 to 18:50, starting February 20th.
  • Value: Students and Alumni: R$100,00, in case of aprovement the value will be returned.
  • External Public: R$1.600,00
  • Professor: Nadja Nara L. Heiderich

 

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COURSE DESCRIPTION

Analysis of topics in applied microeconomics through some scientific papers. The topics chosen involves: scarcity, demand, supply, elasticity, consumer’s and producer’s surplus, markets, externalities, public goods and others themes related to Microeconomics.

 

COURSE OBJECTIVES

Undergraduate students frequently mention that they can’t visualize the application of the economic theory learned at classroom. So, to bring this discussion nearest to the students is the main objective of the course. In addition, research methods be presented so that students understand the structure of scientific research. Consequently, the course intends to stimulate the students to think like a scientist in the resolution of empirical problems. To achieve these goals, the program contains, in your introduction, a revision of scientific method and, in a second part, the analyze of research articles with microeconomics approach.

 

PREREQUISITES

Basic course in Microeconomics; High intermediate english.

 

TOPICS COVERED

Part A: Revision of Scientific Method

 

Session 1: Philosophical background to research

Session 2: Research strategies and tactics

Session 3: The research programme and process

 

Part B:  Analyze of Research Articles

Article 1: Artificial Scarcity, Power, and the Italian Mafia.

Article 2: Demand, supply, and their interaction on markets, as seen from the perspective of evolutionary economic theory.

Article 3: Outlook for World Fertilizer Demand, Supply, and Supply/Demand Balance.

Article 4: Demand elasticities for food products in Brazil: a two-stage budgeting system.

Article 5: Agricultural Land Elasticities in the United States and Brazil.

Article 6: The welfare impact of policy interventions in the food grain markets in Bangladesh.

Article 7: Public gains from entrepreneurial research: Inferences about the economic value of public support of the Small Business Innovation Research program.

Article 8: Ecological Compensation to Address Environmental Externalities: Lessons from South American Case Studies.

Article 9: The concept of public goods, the state, and higher education finance: a view from the BRICs.

 

ASSESSMENT METHODS

  1. NI1: a formal evaluation related to scientific method
  2. NI2:  discussion of one research article chosen by the students separate in couples (80%) and participation in classes, with previous reading of papers (20%)
  3.  PO (Official Exams): the couples must to do a scientific project about any theme related to microeconomics.

 

BIBLIOGRAPHY

Alam, M. et al. The welfare impact of policy interventions in the food grain markets in Bangladesh. Journal of Economic Policy Reform. Sep2011, Vol. 14 Issue 3, p215-225. 11p.

Allen, S.; Layson, S. e Link, Albert. Public gains from entrepreneurial research: Inferences about the economic value of public support of the Small Business Innovation Research program. Research Evaluation. Jun. 2012, Vol. 21 Issue 2, p105-112. 8p.

Barr, K. et al. Agricultural Land Elasticities in the United States and Brazil. Applied Economic Perspectives & Policy. Sep2011, Vol. 33 Issue 3, p449-462. 14p.

CAREY, Stephen S. A beginner’s guide to scientific method. 2nd ed. Belmont, CA: Wadsworth Publishing Company, c1998. viii, 152 p.

Carnoy, M. et. al. The concept of public goods, the state, and higher education finance: a view from the BRICs. Higher Education. Sep. 2014., Vol. 68, Issue 3, p359-378. 20p.

Champeyrache, C. Artificial Scarcity, Power, and the Italian Mafia. Journal of Economic Issues. Sep. 2014, Vol. 48 Issue 3, p625-640. 16p.

Heffer, P.; Prud’homme, M. Outlook for World Fertilizer Demand, Supply, and Supply/Demand Balance. Turkish Journal of Agriculture & Forestry. 2008, Vol. 32 Issue 3, p159-164. 6p.

Nelson, R. Demand, supply, and their interaction on markets, as seen from the perspective of evolutionary economic theory. Journal of Evolutionary Economics. Jan. 2013, Vol. 23 Issue 1, p17-38. 22p.

Reid, J. Ecological Compensation to Address Environmental Externalities: Lessons from South American Case Studies. Journal of Sustainable Forestry. 2015, Vol. 34 Issue 6/7, p605-622. 18p.

REMENYI, D. et al. Doing research in business and management: an introduction to process and method. London: Sage Publications, 1998. vi, 309 p.

Menezes, T.; Azzoni, C. e Silveira, F. Demand elasticities for food products in Brazil: a two-stage budgeting system. Applied Economics. Oct2008, Vol. 40 Issue 19, p2557-2572. 16p.

SAUNDERS, M.N.K. and LEWIS, P. Doing Research in Business and Management: An Essential Guide to Planning Your Project. Pearson: Harlow, 2012.

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